What actually happens when you're here

1. If your pet has been transferred into our care, we'll first do a consultation. This typically takes about 1 hour. If this history is long, it helps if this can be sent ahead. The consultation is broadly divided into

  • Taking the history
  • Performing a clinical examination of the patient
  • Recommending and discussing an appropriate plan of action (investigation) and associated costs. Usually there are several options and you can decide what is right for you. Treatment options and costs can only be made once we've diagnosed the problem.

Usually your pet will be admitted. Approximately 75% of cases are admitted for the day. Animals with problems that are more difficult to diagnose, those where we have to await some test results before proceeding to the next step and those requiring complex treatment will usually need to stay with us for one or more nights.

If your pet is hospitalized, we will speak with you at least once a day, reporting on progress and test results.

You are welcome to visit your pet. Please arrange a specific time so we're not in the midst of a procedure when you arrive.

We will investigate the problem and either perform therapeutic procedures or prescribe medication. We report back to your veterinarian on the outcome. We decide on a case-by-case basis whether you need to come back to see us for check-ups, or whether you will go back to your own vet. If surgery is required we will either refer you back to your own vet to have this done or on to a specialist surgeon. This depends on the complexity of the procedure required.

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2.If your pet has been referred for a specific procedure, this will usually be completed that day. An ultrasound examination will usually take between 30 and 60 minutes, depending on the complexity of the procedure. It may take longer if we need to sedate your pet first. You may wait here, or run some errands and collect your pet when we're done. The Greenacres shopping centre is just down the road.

After the procedure, we will report back to your own vet. Your own vet then decides on further diagnostic procedures and / or treatment. Please understand that we cannot make such recommendations safely without knowing all the case details. In addition, there are legal implications with supersession (This means that legally one vet must retain overall control over the diagnostic tests and treatment prescribed for a particular patient, even if (s)he draws in specialist expertise for particular tests. This is to maximize patient safety, preventing interactions between incompatible drugs and preventing unnecessary tests being performed or repeated.).